Hospital Improvement Innovation Network (HIIN)

HAP serves as one of 17 national, regional, or state hospital associations and health system organizations contracted to reduce preventable hospital-associated conditions and readmissions.

HAP helps Pennsylvania hospitals improve quality and safety of patient care

Harm reduction took center stage in 2011 when HAP received its first contract with the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) Partnership for Patients initiative—a nationwide public-private collaboration focusing on reducing preventable hospital-acquired conditions. Originally the Hospital Engagement Network (HAP HEN), followed by HEN 2.0, and finally, HAP's Hospital Improvement Innovation Network (HAP HIIN).

HAP HIIN's goals include a 20 percent reduction in all-cause harm: Adverse Drug Events, Postoperative Venous Thromboembolism Prevention, Injury from Falls and Immobility, Pressure Ulcers, Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Mortality; and Device Related Infections, including CDI, SSI, CAUTI, and CLABSI. HAP HIIN also aims to achieve a 12 percent reduction in all-cause 30-day readmission rates.

To assist hospitals in achieving these goals, HAP utilizes a clinical staff comprised of registered nurses and infection professionals to oversee these specific areas of focus. Armed with experience, the most recent advances in evidence based care, and a data team dedicated to identifying performance and trends, HAP’s project managers use a variety of tools for improving clinical performance. These tools include: one-on-one coaching calls, office hours open call-in times, peer-to-peer support, e-learning modules, webinars, site visits, in-person events, and other personalized forms of education.  

HAP Contacts

For additional information regarding these patient safety initiatives, please contact Robert Shipp, HAP’s vice president, quality and population health. For media inquiries, contact Rachel Moore, director, media relations.


HAP News

April 02, 2020

Medicare’s “Hospitals Without Walls” Policy Takes Effect Immediately

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced a new initiative this week to allow hospitals to care for patients and bill Medicare and other government payors when they provide services outside traditional hospital settings. This allows for the use of ambulatory surgery centers that have canceled elective surgeries to be used for COVID-19 patient care. In addition, other non-hospital buildings approved by the state also can be used to help expand patient care areas.

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