Young couple talking with clinical staff

Planning for Your Hospital Stay

Before you go to the hospital, name an advocate. Ask a friend or family member to help you while you’re in the hospital. If you’re too sick or worried, your advocate can tell doctors about your health care choices, ask questions and write down answers, and keep copies of important medical papers.

It’s best if your advocate can be with you when you go to the hospital, visit you each day you’re in the hospital, and be with you when you leave the hospital. You and your advocate should have a notebook and a pen to write down important information or questions.

Tell your medical team who your advocate is and describe how they will be involved. If you don’t have an advocate, check with the hospital to see if they have professional advocates available and how they can help you.

Even though your medical history may have been sent to the hospital before you arrive, you should be able to talk to your medical team about past illnesses, immunizations, allergies, hospitalizations, and medical conditions that run in your family.

Many people take more than one medication. Because it’s possible for medicines to combine and cause health problems, bring a list to the hospital of all medicines you take (including vitamins and minerals, herbal or dietary supplements), the amount of each dose, the time you take each dose, and any side effects or reactions you’ve had. If you are not able to make a list, take your medications with you and someone at the hospital will review them with you.

HAP News

January 15, 2020

Federal Attention Building to Address Social Determinants of Health

Urgency is building in Washington, DC, to advance policy to improve coordination in addressing social determinants of health, recognizing that factors such as stable housing, reliable transportation, and access to healthy foods have a direct impact on health and wellness.

January 14, 2020

Duplicative State False Claims Act Could be Counterproductive to Patients, Hospitals

On Monday, the Pennsylvania Attorney General was joined by legislators to outline measures which they believe will curb fraud within Pennsylvania’s Medical Assistance program, Medicaid. While a package of legislation was proposed, the focus of Monday’s announcement was legislation implementing a State False Claims Act in addition to the existing Federal False Claims Act. HAP believes the current federal law is effective and implementing a state false claims is duplicative, unnecessary, and, in some cases, harmful to patient access to care.

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