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Quality

HAP Works With Pennsylvania Hospitals to Reduce Patient Infections

HAP, through the work of its Hospital Improvement Innovation Network (HIIN), is helping Pennsylvania hospitals and health systems to eliminate health care-associated infections such as: 

  • Catheter Infection Prevention—A urinary tract infection (UTI) in the bladder is the most common infection that patients develop while in the hospital. When a catheter is inserted, the risk of developing a UTI increases because bacteria can travel along the catheter tube into the bladder. These infections are called catheter-associated urinary tract infections.    
  • Clostridium difficile Infection Prevention and Antimicrobial StewardshipClostridium difficile Infections is a major health issue for elderly hospitalized patients, and more frequently experienced by women.
  • Central Line Infection Prevention—Central line-associated bloodstream infections are serious infections that occur when germs enter the bloodstream through a central line. Central lines are tubes placed in a large vein in the neck, chest, or arm to give fluids, blood, or medications, or to perform certain medical tests.
  • Surgical-Site Infection Prevention—During surgery or a medical procedure in which an incision is made in the body, a patient could develop a surgical-site infection. These infections are caused by germs, often from the patient’s own body. HAP is working with hospitals to implement strategies to prevent these infections.
  • Ventilator Infection Prevention—Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a lung infection that develops in a person who is on a ventilator. A ventilator is a tube inserted into the lungs to help a patient breathe. While necessary for some patients, their lungs can be exposed to germs that enter the body through the tube.
  • Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock—Sepsis is an inflammatory response to a severe infection which triggers a rapid series of events, such as leaking blood vessels and impaired blood flow. Septic shock occurs when adequate blood pressure can’t be restored. Septic shock may lead to multiple organ failure and death. Early detection and treatment of septic patients is key to improving the health of the patient and reducing the risk of death.

HIIN Goals:

  • Achieve and sustain a 40 percent reduction in catheter-associated urinary tract infections from the baseline
  • Achieve and sustain a 40 percent reduction in hospital onset of Clostridium difficile cases
  • Achieve and sustain a 40 percent reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infections from the baseline
  • Achieve and sustain a 40 percent reduction in surgical-site infections with colon surgeries, abdominal hysterectomy, total hip replacements, and total knee replacements from baseline
  • Achieve and sustain a 40 percent reduction in ventilator-associated pneumonia, as compared to the 2013 baseline data  
  • Achieve and sustain a 40 percent reduction in mortality due to severe sepsis and septic shock from baseline

For additional information about participating in one of these initiatives or if you have a best practice to share about one of these initiatives, please contact Mary Catanzaro, project manager, infection prevention.

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